contact us

22 Victoria Road
Derry~Londonderry
Northern Ireland
BT47 2AB

Tel: +44 (0) 28 7134 2100
Email: general@loughs-agency.org

Dundalk Street,
Carlingford,
Co Louth,
Rep. of Ireland

Tel: +353 (0) 42 938 3888
Email: carlingford@loughs-agency.org

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Eco-Tourism

Lough Foyle and Carlingford Lough are both Special Protection Areas (recognition as important habitats for birds) and Ramsar sites (important wetland habitats).

Lough Foyle and Carlingford Lough are both Special Protection Areas (recognition as important habitats for birds) and Ramsar sites (important wetland habitats).

Carlingford Lough is home to internationally important breeding populations of Sandwich Tern and Common, Arctic and Roseate Terns also occur. The lough supports internationally important numbers of over-wintering Brent Geese. Many other species of wildfowl feed here in winter, too. In addition, there are nationally important numbers of waders, including Oystercatcher, Ringed Plover, Grey Plover, Dunlin and Redshank.

Basking Shark at mouth of Lough Foyle

Lough Foyle is the winter home to internationally important numbers of Whooper Swan, Brent Goose and Bar-tailed Godwit. This site, with its extensive mudflats and marshes, support over 20,000 migratory waterfowl, including nationally important species such as Red-throated Diver, Great Crested Grebe, Bewicks Swan, Greylag Geese, Shelduck , Teal, Mallard, Wigeon, Eider, Red-breasted Merganser, Oystercatcher, Golden Plover, Grey Plover, Lapwing, Knot, Dunlin, Curlew, Redshank and Greenshank.

The River Foyle and its tributaries are designated a Special Area of Conservation, being of importance because of habitat and particular species of flora and fauna that occur. This designation aims to conserve the habitat and plant and animal species of the river system, particularly the internationally significant population of Atlantic Salmon.

Sea mammals are encountered both in and offshore from Carlingford Lough and Lough Foyle, such as turtle (occasionally beached) and whales (a Killer Whale swam up the Foyle into the city centre of Derry in the 1970s). Porpoise and Dolphin are seen regularly and seals breed in the loughs and, although not always welcome by fishermen, make interesting watching!

The cliffs and islands of Inishowen host several sea bird colonies – guillemot, razorbill, fulmar, kittiwake, storm petrel, shag, cormorant and gulls.

Leave No Trace

  1. Plan Ahead and Prepare
  2. Be Considerate of Others
  3. Respect Farm Animals and Wildlife
  4. Travel and Camp on Durable Ground
  5. Leave What You Find
  6. Dispose of Waste Properly
  7. Minimise the Effects of Fire